The School of Adversity

Dr. Donahue works with catalytic leaders and leadership teams to help leaders maximize their leadership capacity, sharpen missional clarity, build transformational groups and teams. He is a growth coach to senior leaders who act as catalysts for change personally and organizationally.

It’s compulsory education for every person on the planet. You simply must attend the School of Adversity.

School of Adversity Quote - There is no education like adversity

You need only meet 1 of 2 entrance requirements and you are automatically enrolled. No need to go online or show up at registration. If you 1) have a pulse or, 2) you can fog a mirror, you’re enrolled. Mandatory. There are no vouchers and no “school choice” options available. Once enrolled, classes begin immediately and might be held any day of the week, 365 days a year. There are no vacation days and no holidays (but there are LOTS of sick days).

It is likely each of us will take different classes in the School (Stomach Flu 101, My Teenager Hates Me 407, Chronic Unemployment 511- a graduate level course) and probably we’ll have different majors. NOTE: majors are assigned, rarely chosen. Some students will find themselves in the popular Financial Ruin Program or taking several courses in the Perpetual Pain Department. And almost everyone does a minor in Annoying Facebook Friends.

But no one gets a pass. Ever.

There are no strings you can pull. No Congressman or Senator can get you out or provide an appointment to a less rigorous program (like enrolling in the popular School of Rock – sorry, Jack Black).  There is no AP credit or credit transfers from other highly acclaimed, elite programs like the School of Hard Knocks (I spent a couple semesters there – it was hard…very, very hard).

Like it or not, you must enroll in the School of Adversity.

But don’t worry; no one can make you graduate. Actually, no one graduates. Ever. It’s like continuing education for CPA’s or required HR training classes on wellness management. Classes start and continue all the way to infinity… and beyond. Well, I suppose this is a graduation day. But you really do not want to hear about it.

Also, there are no online or virtual courses. Every class is live, has no official professor, and always takes place in the Experiential Learning Lab. All classes are on campus, but it is easy to get there. The campus address is: 5 Your Location, Anywhere, Earth.

Another bummer is cost. The School can be quite expensive. Actual costs may vary from student to student, and there are no scholarships or financial aid. Everyone pays full price regardless of how many classes you are taking, so you might as well load up early. Heck, I knew a guy who was carrying 42 hours one semester, and he almost died. Really, it almost killed him. He said he learned more that semester than in any other. But it was brutal. Made Med School and MIT look like kindergarten classes.

One thing you want to avoid at all costs – taking classes alone. As a matter of fact, going through the School of Adversity is a lot better if someone takes the classes with you. It is not only allowed, it is encouraged! (You can share answers, ask for help and solve the same problems using the same solutions others have already discovered! They are all cataloged in the Wisdom Library if you take the time to find them. That part is very cool.)

Actually, large families, small groups, neighborhood communities, and sometimes – this is hard to imagine – entire countries have gone through a class together! It makes the School of Hard Knocks look easy by comparison.

There is something about doing it together that not only makes it better, but each class seems to get a little easier to handle; the surprise quizzes are not so surprising, the tests require less preparation and study, and you tend to get higher grades. Did I mention that grades matter?

How you perform prepares you for the next class, though it might be in a different department. For example, I did well some years ago in the introductory Facing Your Fears 101 class because I had already taken Working in a High-Crime Area 201. Facing Your Fears is usually a pre-requisite for all 200-level classes, but for some reason I was forced to take WHCA 201 first. That happens quite often. Classes are rarely offered in logical order. (Very annoying. But there is an elective to help with that now: Annoyances and Petty Frustrations 001 is available whenever you plan a vacation or prepare for Christmas.)

And, surprisingly at first, many students report a sense of joy and gratitude after completing a particularly difficult class! Kind of counter-intuitive  to say the least, though I confess I understand.

Well, I am off to class. Right now I am just beginning Character Growth 204 with a group of friends. There is no syllabus so we do not know what will happen. But we are told by the Administration that we will have the choice to “become bitter or better” as a result of what we experience. Not sure I am looking forward to all of it, but I hear they do have recess and a snack!

Since Christmas I have been enrolled in several courses of moderate but annoying difficulty: Your Wife Broke Her Leg at Christmas 305, Daughter Badly Sprained Ankle in Championship Game 208, I Threw My Back Out Sunday 401 (an intensive 3-day seminar), Son’s Car Needs 3rd Repair in Two Weeks 510, and The Water Pump for Your Home Broke 211.

I am discovering that the School of Adversity while not always a fun place to visit is a great place to learn.

I am getting better at responding with joy in the struggle of pain, listening more carefully to God and others when trials come crashing down, and building up some tolerance to the dozens of small annoyances that pester me like sand flies on the beach of life.

And I continue to gain empathy and respect for the awful circumstances and challenges others face worldwide (in doctoral-level courses I dare not even name and, thankfully, will hopefully never have to take.)

Like you, I am a full-time student in the School of Adversity. So off to class I go. Oh no, my car won’t start…That’s just great…I’ll be late for class.

Oh, wait a minute. This IS my class. Here we go. Hope I pass. Wanna join me?

 

What Courses are you taking in the School of Adversity? What are you learning? How can you and others get through it together?

 

We would like to encourage your feedback as it helps us to identify the issues that are important to you. It also helps others who are searching to develop new creative ways of leading. Thank you in advance for your comments.

Who’s Messing with the Church?!?!

Dr. Donahue works with catalytic leaders and leadership teams to help leaders maximize their leadership capacity, sharpen missional clarity, build transformational groups and teams. He is a growth coach to senior leaders who act as catalysts for change personally and organizationally.

Clayton Christensen of Harvard Business School argues for “disruptive innovations” because organizations that only invest in “sustaining innovations” leave the door open to disruptive innovations. Here are some examples from his innovation model.(You can read more in the links in this article).

Disruptor
Cellular phones
Community colleges
Discount retailers
Retail medical clinics
Disruptee
Fixed line telephony
Four-year colleges
Full-service department stores
Traditional doctor’s offices

Q:What “disruptive innovations” have taken place in the church?

Multi-site, missional communities, on-line training, simulcast conferences, multi-leader staffs. Each has disrupted the conventional thinking or models that prevailed (like single site churches, traditional small groups, on-campus training, single-site live conferences, hierarchical staff models, etc.)

What about the future of the church? Who amongst us is willing to make a mess, becoming what you were NOT allowed to be in school or even in seminary — DISRUPTIVE!

Sounds like fun.

Hand me the paint and the crayons!

The Next 10 Years

Dr. Donahue works with catalytic leaders and leadership teams to help leaders maximize their leadership capacity, sharpen missional clarity, build transformational groups and teams. He is a growth coach to senior leaders who act as catalysts for change personally and organizationally.

Satisfied with the last ten years? Eager for the next ten? Or does thinking about this overwhelm you because you’re not even sure what you should focus on? Asking the right questions is a big part of the process. When working with leaders who are making adjustments, corrections and re-evaluations in life, I guide them to ask the following:

1) What “social capital”  do I have that can be invested in my future?

Time
Money
Knowledge
Experiences

2) What defining moments have shaped my view of the world as I look at the next 10-30 years?

3) What motivates me about my current work (other than making money) that I would like to carry forward? (negotiation skills, the art of the deal, connecting with people, strategic analysis, making the sale, helping a client be successful, controlling my time, leveraging my network, etc.)?

4) How can I enhance my capacity for what I want to do next? (reduce hours, re-define focus, downsize the organization’s need for me to be there, build new networks, redeploy funds toward launching my next era, taking a personal retreat to reflect and explore options, etc.)

5) What are my energy drivers? (Where do my passions lie? What gets me up in the morning? Identify areas of joy, inspiration, and enthusiasm in any area of life)

What are the questions you need to be asking yourself? Do you have someone to help you with the process?